Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Picked up a de-soldering station
#1
I picked up a ZD-985 vacuum de-soldering station after a lot of looking.

I generally have a very poor opinion of the quality found in products from China, but after reading a lot of reviews and viewing some tear-down videos I decided to give this unit a chance.
The price on a name brand de-solder station seemed well out reach for my hobby use.
Soldering stations are a different story as quality brands can be found at decent prices.

First thing that I did was tear the unit apart. The reviewed units had some safety issues. I found that my unit had proper fusing, grounding, and that the power switch was on the correct side of the line cord. Obviously some improvements have been made since the early units.

I have done plenty of de-soldering using solder wick, solder suckers, and a Weller DS40 with the squeeze bulb. The ZD-985 is by far the easiest. It works so well that using it was fun. I grabbed a junk double sided board with through plated holes to test it out on. I was able to remove 14-pin dip ic's in less than a minute each. When I was done, the board and the components had no signs of damage or overheating. This thing is slick!

If you do a lot of through hole de-soldering, I think that you would enjoy having one of these.

   

No, My bench is not normally nearly this clean.
Reply
#2
(12-18-2015, 08:35 PM)KF7DVN Wrote: I picked up a ZD-985 vacuum de-soldering station after a lot of looking.

<snip>

No, My bench is not normally nearly this clean.

I'm about half way through doing a repair on a circuit board for a friend, and a de-soldering setup should make the work go a little more smoothly.

After watching and re-watching the EEVblog review of the ZD-985, I pulled the trigger on one. It will be interesting to see if they've addressed any of the problems Dave pointed out.

[RC]
Reply
#3
Found out that you need to give these a little time to warm up.
If you start desoldering as soon as the tip gets up to temp, it can plug.
Using the cleaning rod often is a good idea too.

I found that if it plugs and the cleaning rod can't budge it, don't force the rod with pliers.
I got really rough with mine and broke the tube free from the heater element. (good thing parts are cheap)
The better way to deal with plugs is to get a soldering iron into the inside end of the tube while using the cleaning rod.

I have been running mine around 650f or 700f for higher thermal mass parts.
I still think it was a good buy.
My unit already had the recommended safety mods from the factory.

-Matt
Reply
#4
(03-30-2016, 08:18 PM)KF7DVN Wrote: <snip>

I have been running mine around 650f or 700f for higher thermal mass parts.
I still think it was a good buy.
My unit already had the recommended safety mods from the factory.

-Matt

I modified the gun holder with some wire bracing, so that it doesn't flex so much. My next mod will be to track down an iron with a compatible thermocouple, and see whether it can be used for soldering as well.

[RC]
Reply


Bookmarks

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)